A functional solution to interfacitis?

noun: interfacitis
inflammation of a software, most commonly from overuse of interfaces and other abstractions but also from… well… actually it’s mostly just interfaces.

An illness of tedium

Over the years my experience has come to show me that unnecessary abstractions cause some of the most significant overheads and inertia in software projects. Specifically, I want to talk about one of the more tedious and time consuming areas of maintaining abstracted code; that which lies in the overzealous use of interfaces (C#/Java).

Neither C# or Java are particularly terse languages. When compared to F# with its Hindley-Milner type inference, working in these high-level OO languages often feels like filling out forms in triplicate. All too often I have experienced the already verbose syntax of these languages amplified by dozens of lengthy interfaces, each only there to repeat the exact signature of it’s singular implementation. I’m sure you’ve all been there. In my experience this is one of the more painful areas of maintenance, causing slowdowns, distraction and lack of focus. And I’ve been thinking for some time now that we’d probably be better off using interfaces (or even thin abstract classes) only when absolutely necessary.

What is necessary?

I like to apply a simple yard stick here: if you have a piece of application functionality that necessitates the ability to call multiple different implementations of a component then you probably require an interface. This means situations such as plugins or provider-based architectures would use an interface (of course!) but your CustomerRegistrationService that is called only by your CustomerRegistrationController will not. The message is simple, don’t start introducing unnecessary bureaucracy for the sake of it.

There are, I admit, cases where you might feel abstraction is required. What about a component that calls out to a third party system on the network? Surely you want to be able to isolate this behind an interface? And so I put it to you; why do you need an interface here? Why not use a function? After all, C# is now very well equipped with numerous, elegant functional features and many popular DI frameworks support delegate injection. Furthermore if you are following the SOLID practice of interface segregation then chances are your interface will contain only one or two method definitions anyways.

An example

So, for those times when you absolutely must abstract a single implementation, here is a simple example of an MVC controller using ‘functional’ IoC:

public class RegistrationController : Controller

    private readonly Func<string, RegistrationDetails> _registrationDetailsQuery;

    public RegistrationController(Func<string, RegistrationDetails> registrationDetailsQuery)
        _registrationDetailsQuery = registrationDetailsQuery;

    public ActionResult Index()
        var currentRegistration = _registrationDetailsQuery(User.Identity.Name);

        var viewModel = ViewModelMapper.Instance
            .Map<RegistrationDetails, RegistrationDetailsViewModel>(currentRegistration);

        return View(viewModel);



13-March-2018: It has been pointed out to me that a further benefit of this approach is that static providers may also supply IoC dependencies whereas instances are required for interface-based IoC. What are your thoughts on this approach?

A functional solution to interfacitis?

Demystifying AI – The AI explosion

This is an article I had originally written as part of a stream of work that has now been put on hold indefinitely. I thought it a shame for it to languish in OneNote.

What’s with all this attention to Artificial Intelligence then?

Well that is a very good question. To be perfectly frank, not that much has changed of late in the world of Artificial Intelligence (AI) as a whole that should justify all the current excitement. That’s not to say that there isn’t cool stuff going on; there really is great progress being made… in the world of Machine Learning. And if we are to begin the process of ‘Demystifying AI’ then this is a very good place to start.


AI is a very broad area of technology encompassing research from robotics to computing emotions (affective computing) and everything in between, including Machine Learning or ‘ML’. As alluded to just a moment ago it is within ML specifically that we are seeing the greatest progress. Think of a modern ‘AI’ technology that is gaining a lot of attention and you can place a safe bet on it specifically using ML techniques: Natural Language Processing? That’s ML. Image classification? That’s ML. Sentiment Analysis? Also ML. The recent news of Go players being defeated by a computer? You guessed it… ML.


What is ML?

ML is an approach to analysing data that is based on training statistical models to predict outcomes. You may well have come across Statistical (or Linear) Regression back in your school days; well this is possibly the best known example from a range of techniques that make up the world of ML. To put it simply, an ML model learns from past data to make better decisions in the future.


Now it’s time to introduce what is arguably the beating heart of the AI frenzy: Deep Learning. While there are no trendy acronyms for Deep Learning it is fair to say that Deep Learning has become a bit of a buzz-word itself. Deep Learning takes its name from the concept of Deep Neural Networks (or DNNs, there’s your acronym!). The useful details of what DNNs are and how they function cannot be easily summarized, suffice it to say that DNNs are an ML technology that borrows heavily from the structure of the brain, hence the ‘neural’ part of the name. [N.B. These details are already planned for a follow-up piece.] To re-cap: Deep Learning is a subset of ML, which is in-turn a subset of AI and it is Deep Learning that drives the current hype.


What is Deep Learning?

Say you wanted to build some software to identify objects in an image; your usual non-Deep-Learning approach to this would include manually writing rules into the software to recognise the details you’re looking for. If you wanted to identify if a picture was of a bird or a cat, you would manually write rules to identify features such as whiskers or ears or wings and so on. This is complicated, time-consuming and error prone. Deep Learning takes a different approach. Instead you would create a Deep Learning model then supply it with a bunch of pictures. For each picture you supply, you would tell the model if it was of a bird or a cat. As you supply each image and it’s corresponding label, the model learns. Once enough data has been supplied you can then supply an image without a label and the model will give an accurate indication of whether it is a bird or a cat.


So what is the ‘explosion’ all about?

Continuing the bird/cat model example, the more example labelled pictures you supply to the model, the better the results will be. This seems simple and even somewhat obvious but it strikes at the heart of the current ‘AI boom’. Deep Learning has been around for a while now, evolving over a period of 30 years more or less, and one of the key reasons that it has never been so commercially successful as now is that there just hasn’t been enough readily available data to make it so accessible. To give you some idea of why this has been an issue, if you want to get to a high level of accuracy for classifying complex pictures then you’re going to need  thousands or even millions of examples depending on the complexity. Well we now have data, lots and lots and lots of it and it has never been more easy to get our hands on it. Do a quick Google image search for ‘Cat’; there is a rough cut of half your ‘training’ set (*ahem* copyright issues aside) and I’m sure you can figure out how to get the other half.


So we have data, but that isn’t all we need. The other side of the current explosion is raw computing power. Building a statistical model that can accurately identify cats and birds in pictures is very heavy work for a computer but thankfully with the advent of cloud-scale computing resources, available computing power is now big enough and cheap enough to make running this sort of model both practical and cost-effective. It’s cheap enough that Google can even give this stuff away as an educational toy (https://teachablemachine.withgoogle.com/).


So its all about pictures of cats and birds?

Beyond the abundance of data and computing power, probably the most significant factor in the commercial success of Deep Learning is its versatility. This is especially true when considering the success of Deep Learning against other ML techniques which have not gained the same level of attention. If you have enough data, regardless of its form, Deep Learning can be trained to extract knowledge from it. This has sent businesses, scientists and engineers into a global flurry of R&D to find all the amazing ways in which this technology can enhance our lives.

For years now the financial services industry has been at the forefront of applying ML techniques to everything from fraud prevention and risk management to investments and savings predictions; there are few – if any – areas of the industry that have yet to see the benefits of AI.

Manufacturing is seeing growing uptake in the application of ML to improve efficiency through waste reduction and better predictive analysis of production demands and infrastructure maintenance.

More recently utilities are beginning to get into the ML game with the UK National Grid striking up discussions with Google to investigate applying the infamous DeepMind AI to maximise National Grid’s use of renewables and to more efficiently balance supply and demand across its nationwide infrastructure.

Across all sectors business now find themselves in a position to use ML to better understand and engage with their customers. From utilities gaining greater knowledge of their customer’s consumption habits through to retailers and service providers more effectively capturing sales conversion opportunities, the possibilities are as varied as your data.


Would you like some knowledge with that?

So that concludes this effort to clear away some of the fog and hyperbole from the current AI phenomenon (ahem! It’s all ML, remember!?). In a nutshell, if you have a ton of data and you need to get knowledge from it then Deep Learning could well be your go-to tool.

Demystifying AI – The AI explosion

FileFormatException: Format error in package

OK so we’re all completely clear on what this error means and what must be done to resolve it right? I mean with a meaningful error like that how can anyone be mistaken? Oh? What’s that? You still don’t know? Let’s be a bit more specific: System.IO.FileFormatException: Format error in package Better? Didn’t think so. It’s not an error message, that’s why. I’ll tell you what it is though, it’s stupid and even more stupid when you find out what causes it.

I came across this delightfully wishy-washy error when configuring an Umbraco 7 deployment pipeline in TeamCity and Octopus Deploy. The Umbraco .csproj MSBuild file referenced a bunch of files as you might expect but I also needed to add a .nuspec file which referenced a bunch of other files. Long-story-short, the error came about because the files specified by the .csproj overlapped with the files specified by the .nuspec file. There were about 1000-odd generated files that the NuGet packaging components in their infinite wisdom added to the .nupkg archive as many times as they were referenced. NuGet was able to do this silly thing without any complaints and inspecting the confused package in NuGet Package Explorer or 7Zip or Windows Zip gave no indication of any issues whatsoever. It was not until Octopus called on NuGet to unpack the archive for deployment that we got the above error.

Stupid, right? Stupid!

FYI: I was able to get to the bottom of this issue after 2 freaking days of pain when I eventually used JetBrains dotPeek to debug step-through the NuGet.Core and System.IO.Packaging components to see what on earth was going on. In the end it was this piece of code in System.IO.Packaging.Package that was causing the issue:

public PackagePartCollection GetParts()
	PackagePart[] partsCore = this.GetPartsCore();
	Dictionary dictionary = new Dictionary(partsCore.Length);
	for (int index = 0; index < partsCore.Length; ++index)
	  PackUriHelper.ValidatedPartUri uri = (PackUriHelper.ValidatedPartUri) partsCore[index].Uri;
	  if (dictionary.ContainsKey(uri))
		throw new FileFormatException(MS.Internal.WindowsBase.SR.Get("BadPackageFormat"));
	  dictionary.Add(uri, partsCore[index]);

I mean, why would anyone consuming such a core piece of functionality as this API ever want to know anything about the conditions that led to the corruption of a 30MB package containing thousands of files? I mean it’s not like System.IO.Packaging was ever intended to be re-used all across the globe, right?

Anyways, here’s the error log for helping others with searching for this error and stuff.

[14:21:27]Step 1/1: Create Octopus Release
[14:21:27][Step 1/1] Step 1/1: Create Octopus release (OctopusDeploy: Create release)
[14:21:27][Step 1/1] Octopus Deploy
[14:21:27][Octopus Deploy] Running command:   octo.exe create-release --server https://octopus.url --apikey SECRET --project client-co-uk --enableservicemessages --channel Client Release --deployto Client CI --progress --packagesFolder=packagesFolder
[14:21:27][Octopus Deploy] Creating Octopus Deploy release
[14:21:27][Octopus Deploy] Octopus Deploy Command Line Tool, version 3.3.8+Branch.master.Sha.f8a34fc6097785d7d382ddfaa9a7f009f29bc5fb
[14:21:27][Octopus Deploy] 
[14:21:27][Octopus Deploy] Build environment is NoneOrUnknown
[14:21:27][Octopus Deploy] Using package versions from folder: packagesFolder
[14:21:27][Octopus Deploy] Package file: packagesFolder\Client.0.1.0-unstable0047.nupkg
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy] System.IO.FileFormatException: Format error in package.
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at System.IO.Packaging.Package.GetParts()
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at System.IO.Packaging.Package.Open(Stream stream, FileMode packageMode, FileAccess packageAccess, Boolean streaming)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at System.IO.Packaging.Package.Open(Stream stream)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at NuGet.ZipPackage.GetManifestStreamFromPackage(Stream packageStream)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at NuGet.ZipPackage.c__DisplayClassa.b__5()
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at NuGet.ZipPackage.EnsureManifest(Func`1 manifestStreamFactory)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at NuGet.ZipPackage..ctor(String filePath, Boolean enableCaching)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.PackageVersionResolver.AddFolder(String folderPath)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.CreateReleaseCommand.c__DisplayClass1_0.b__5(String v)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.OptionSet.c__DisplayClass15_0.b__0(OptionValueCollection v)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.OptionSet.ActionOption.OnParseComplete(OptionContext c)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.Option.Invoke(OptionContext c)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.OptionSet.ParseValue(String option, OptionContext c)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.OptionSet.Parse(String argument, OptionContext c)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.OptionSet.c__DisplayClass26_0.b__0(String argument)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at System.Linq.Enumerable.WhereArrayIterator`1.MoveNext()
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at System.Collections.Generic.List`1..ctor(IEnumerable`1 collection)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at System.Linq.Enumerable.ToList[TSource](IEnumerable`1 source)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.OptionSet.Parse(IEnumerable`1 arguments)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.Options.Parse(IEnumerable`1 arguments)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Commands.ApiCommand.Execute(String[] commandLineArguments)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy]    at Octopus.Cli.Program.Main(String[] args)
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy] Exit code: -3
[14:21:28][Octopus Deploy] Octo.exe exit code: -3
[14:21:28][Step 1/1] Unable to create or deploy release. Please check the build log for details on the error.
[14:21:28][Step 1/1] Step Create Octopus release (OctopusDeploy: Create release) failed
FileFormatException: Format error in package

Crash debugging Windows 10 Mobile UWP apps

So your app is crashing

This post explains how to get the details of the root managed .NET exception of a crash in a Windows 10 UWP app, specifically on the Windows 10 Mobile ARM platform. Hopefully this post will save you from some of the pain that I endured and aid you in getting to the bottom of your crashing app. Also note that with some minor differences – that I shall include as best I can in this article – this should in theory also work for debugging any UWP store apps on the x86 and x64 Windows 10 platforms although I have not tested this.

I’ll not detail the complete end-to-end process here as it is varied and lengthy and the core of the process is covered in excellent detail in a two-part series of posts by Andrew Richards of the Microsoft NTDebugging blog: ‘Debugging a Windows 8.1 Store App Crash Dump‘ Part 1 and Part 2.

The issue I found with following that series of posts alone is they are missing some key information if you are working on the Windows 10 UWP platform. No surprise when you consider that they were intended for Windows 8.1 Store platform. But they are full of essential details for the similar parts of the process on Windows 10 UWP and they got me so close!

In this post I will detail the information that is not already available in the above posts and how it fits into the overall process of debugging crash dumps from UWP apps running on the Windows 10 Mobile platform.

Enable and collect crash dumps

First off, make sure that Windows 10 Mobile will collect crash dumps by heading to Settings -> Update & Security -> For developers and ensure that the value of the settings labelled ‘Save this many crash dumps’ is greater than 0. I’d recommend at least 3.

Now reproduce the crash a couple of times to generate the crash dumps. The dump files should now be available under your device’s \Documents\Debug directory on the device storage. Note that it can take a few minutes to completely save the dump files and if you see any files here named ‘SOMETHING.part’ then the dumps are still being saved so come back in a minute or two. Move the dump files onto the machine where the debugging will take place.

Now on to the experts

Now I’ll pass you over to the aforementioned articles which explain how to fire up the dump files in WinDbg. Just as a heads up that at the time of writing this the latest Windows 10 Debugging Tools (WinDbg) are available from here.

If your crashes are indeed caused by managed code that you have written, generated or otherwise included then you will inevitably end up being directed to use SOS to elicit the details of the exception that is being thrown. This is where things got tricky for me and if you do get to this point then return here and read on…

Filling in the gaps

Now that you may have tried invoking, loading and even locating SOS and the CLR or DAC modules, I can tell you that these components are not where or even what the article describes. First of all I spent some time trying to confirm that the CLR or DAC was loaded as it should be according to most sources on this subject. Eventually after much trial and error I tried issuing a reload command to ensure the correct core framework was loaded. This is done with the following command (see documentation here). Also note that this step might not be necessary for you.

.cordll -ve -u -l

Which, for me, results in the following output:

CLRDLL: Unable to find 'mrt100dac.dll' on the path
Automatically loaded SOS Extension
CLRDLL: Loaded DLL c:\symbols\mrt100dac_winarm_x86.dll\561408BF43000\mrt100dac_winarm_x86.dll
CLR DLL status: Loaded DLL c:\symbols\mrt100dac_winarm_x86.dll\561408BF43000\mrt100dac_winarm_x86.dll

This is all fine but is not quite what I expected to see and leads onto the issue with using SOS. As you can see, SOS is supposedly loaded by the above command but normal SOS commands/invocations still will not work. The above DLLs gave me some clue to what was going on here and when I looked to see where this mrt100dac_winarm_x86.dl was located it led me to find the SOS DLL. In my environment, everything can be found here: C:\Program Files (x86)\MSBuild\Microsoft\.NetNative\arm and I can see here a DLL named mrt100sos.dll and a few variants thereof. So it looks as if there is a special distribution of SOS for the Universal platform, which makes sense.

NOTE: This is where the differences between the different platforms (ARM, x86, x64) will come into play. I suspect that this should be the same process for debugging UWP apps on all platforms but I cannot say for certain. At the very least you will see different modules/DLLs listed above and the different platform modules can all be found under: %Program Files%\MSBuild\Microsoft\.NetNative,

Armed with this knowledge I then headed back to Google and thankfully (luckily!) found one mention of using mrt100sos on a blurb for a non-existent Channel 9 show:

…This is very similar to how CLR Exceptions are discovered. Instead of using SOS, MRT uses mrt100sos.dll or mrt100sos_x86.dll (depending on the target). The command is !mrt100sos.pe -ccw <nested exception> . The same command(s) for CLR Exceptions is !sos.dumpccw <addr> –> !sos.pe <managed object address>.

And sure enough if you follow on from Andrew’s Windows 8.1 Store App articles with the above commands you will be able to see your managed exception in all its detailed beauty. In the following example <Exception Address> would be the value of ExceptionAddress or NestedException in your WinDbg output:

!mrt100sos.pe -ccw <Exception Address>

As an example, I had the following WinDbg output:

0:005> dt -a1 031df3c8 combase!_STOWED_EXCEPTION_INFORMATION_V2*
[0] @ 031df3c8
+0x008 ResultCode       : 80131509
+0x00c ExceptionForm    : 0y01
+0x00c ThreadId         : 0y000000000000000000001111001100 (0x3cc)
+0x010 ExceptionAddress : 0x7778afbb Void
+0x014 StackTraceWordSize : 4
+0x018 StackTraceWords  : 0x19
+0x01c StackTrace       : 0x008c67e8 Void
+0x010 ErrorText        : 0x7778afbb  "¨滰???"
+0x020 NestedExceptionType : 0x314f454c
+0x024 NestedException  : 0x008d09a0 Void

Taking the above NestedException address, I end up with the following command and resulting output. And this was all I needed to locate the bug.

0:005> !mrt100sos.pe -ccw 0x008d09a0
Exception object: 00f132ac
Exception type:   System.InvalidOperationException
Message:          NoMatch
InnerException:   <none>
StackTrace (generated):
IP       Function
65c279d5 ProblemApp_65810000!$51_System::Linq::Enumerable.First<System.__Canon>+0x99
65c27729 ProblemApp_65810000!$2_ProblemApp::Utilities::AssetsCache::<loadImage>d__4.MoveNext+0xa5
65539115 SharedLibrary!System::Runtime::ExceptionServices::ExceptionDispatchInfo.Throw+0x19
65539317 SharedLibrary!$13_System::Runtime::CompilerServices::TaskAwaiter.ThrowForNonSuccess+0x4b
655392c5 SharedLibrary!$13_System::Runtime::CompilerServices::TaskAwaiter.HandleNonSuccessAndDebuggerNotification+0x41
6553927d SharedLibrary!$13_System::Runtime::CompilerServices::TaskAwaiter.ValidateEnd+0x19
654ccea1 SharedLibrary!$13_System::Runtime::CompilerServices::TaskAwaiter$1<System::__Canon>.GetResult+0x11
65cf0285 ProblemApp_65810000!$2_ProblemApp::Utilities::AssetsCache::<Initialize>d__2.MoveNext+0x175

Would love to RTFM!

So hopefully this will help some poor souls who like me have to debug crashing Windows 10 Mobile UWP apps. If anyone knows of some proper documentation for the mrt100sos commands I would be eternally grateful!

Crash debugging Windows 10 Mobile UWP apps

LinkedIn Error “There was a problem sharing your update. Please try again”.

Obscure Error

I was trying to reply to a comment on an article I posted to LinkedIn the other day and kept hitting the error “There was a problem sharing your update. Please try again”. Just a note to help anyone who might come across this error when attempting to post an update to LinkedIn, there is an unadvertised comment character limit of 800 characters.

A little help?

It would be great if this was made obvious somewhere such as in the error itself or at least somewhere on the site but even searching the Internet for “There was a problem sharing your update. Please try again” didn’t turn up much for me. It wasn’t until I opened a support ticket that I was given this info.

I hope posting this here will at some point in the future save someone from wasting the time I did.

LinkedIn Error “There was a problem sharing your update. Please try again”.

Things I wish I knew 10 years ago: Abstractions

We need to talk about abstractions

The main reason I decided to start this blog is that I have begun working for a company that has genuinely challenged many of my assumptions about how software should be developed. I have spent much of my career learning from the more prominent voices in software development about how to write software effectively. I have learned, practiced and preached the tenets of clean code, TDD, layered design, SOLID, to name a few of the better known programming practices and had always believed that I was on a true path to robust, maintainable software. Now I find myself in a position where over the space of just one year I have already questioned many of the practices I had learned and taught in the preceding decade.

I hope to share on this blog much of what I have discovered of late but for my first entry discussing programming practices I want to talk about abstractions. In particular I want to call into question what I have come to understand as overuse of abstractions – hiding implementations away in layers/packages, behind interfaces, using IoC and dependency inversion – as often encountered in the C#/.NET and Java world.


I have been wondering lately if I have simply spent years misunderstanding and misapplying abstractions, but I have seen enough code written by others in books, tutorials, blogs, sample code and more diagrams than I can bear to know that I have not been alone in my practices. Furthermore, I have found myself on a few occasions of late in discussions with developers of similar experience who have come to share a similar feeling towards abstractions.

The all too familiar layer diagram
The all too familiar layer diagram. © Microsoft. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff648105.aspx
A typical layering structure
A typical layering structure

So what do I mean by abstractions and what is the point of them, really? The old premise and the one that I would always reiterate is that abstractions help enforce separation of concerns (SoC) by isolating implementation details from calling code. The reasoning being that code of one concern should be able to change without affecting the code dealing with other concerns, supposedly because code dealing with one concern will change for different reasons and at different times than the code dealing with other concerns. Of course we mustn’t forget that one of the more natural causes of abstractions is the isolation of logic to enable Unit Testing. Ultimately the result is that software is written in such a way that the different code dealing with different concerns is kept separate by abstractions such as interfaces and layers while making use of IoC and Dependency Injection to wire the abstractions together. Furthermore it is worth me stating that the usual separate ‘concerns’ touted by such advocacy frequently includes Presentation/UI, Service/Application Logic, Business Logic, Data Access Logic, Security, Logging, etc.

public class StudentController : Controller

    private readonly IStudentRepository _repository;
    private readonly IStudentService _service;
    private readonly IUnitOfWork _unitOfWork;

    public StudentController
        IStudentRepository repository, 
        IStudentService service, 
        IUnitOfWork unitOfWork
        _repository = repository;
        _service = service;
        _unitOfWork = unitOfWork;

    public ActionResult UpdateStudentDetails(StudentDetailsViewModel model)
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
            var student = _repository.Get(model.StudentId);

            student.Forename = model.Forename;
            student.Surname = model.Surname;
            student.Urn = model.Urn;



        return View(model);

Abstracted code, obscurity through indirection.


I am not about to start claiming that everything should just be thrown together in one Big Ball of Mud. I still feel that SoC certainly is worth following but it can be effectively achieved by applying simple encapsulation, such as putting more repetitive and complex logic of one concern within its own class so that it may be repeatedly invoked by code dealing with other concerns. An example of this would be the code to take an entity key, fetch and materialize the correlating entity from a data store and return it to the caller. This would be well served in a method of a repository class that can be called by code that simply needs the entity. Of course packages/libraries also have their place, in sharing logic across multiple applications or solutions.

Where I see problems starting to arise is when, for example, the aforementioned repository is hidden behind an interface, likely in a separate layer/package/library and dynamically loaded by an IoC infrastructure at runtime. Let’s not pull any punches here, this practice is hiding significant swathes of software behind a dynamic infrastructure which is only resolved at runtime. With the exception of some very specific cases, I see this practice as overused, unnecessarily complex and lacking in the obvious transparency that code must feature to be truly maintainable. The problem is further compounded by the common definition of the separate concerns and layers themselves. Experience has shown me that when coming to maintain an application that makes use of all of these practices you end up with a voice screaming in your head “Get the hell out of my way!”. The abstractions don’t seem to help like they promise and all of their complexity just creates so much overhead that slows down debugging and impedes changes of any significant proportion.

With one exception I have never spoken to anyone who has ever had to swap out an entire layer (i.e. UI, Services, Logic, Data Access, etc.) of their software. I’ve personally been involved in one project where it was required but it was a likely eventuality right from the start and so we were prepared for it. I have rarely seen an example of an implementation of an abstraction being swapped or otherwise significantly altered that did not affect its dependents, regardless of the abstraction. Whenever I have seen large changes made to software it very rarely involves ripping out an entire horizontal layer, tier or storage mechanism. Rather it will frequently involve ripping out or refactoring right across all layers affecting in one change the storage tables, the objects and logic that rely on those tables and the UI or API that relies on those objects and logic. More often than not large changes are made to a single business feature across the entire vertical stack, not a single conceptual technical layer and so it stands to reason that should anything need separating to minimise the impact of changes it should be the features not the technical concerns.

Invest in reality

So my main lesson here is that: The reality of enforcing abstractions through layering and IoC is very different from the theory and usually is not worth it, certainly when used to separate the typical software layers. With the exception of cases such as a component/plug-in design I am now completely convinced that the likelihood of layered abstractions and IoC ever paying off is so small it just isn’t worth the effect that these abstractions have on the immediate maintainability of code. It makes sense in my experience not to focus on abstracting code into horizontal layers and wiring it all up with IoC but to put that focus into building features in vertical slices, with each slice organised into namespaces/folders within the same project (think MVC areas and to a lesser extent the DDD Bounded Context). Spend the effort saved by this simplification keeping the code within the slices clear, cohesive and transparent so that it is easy for someone else to come along, understand and debug. I’d even go so far as to try to keep these slices loosely dependent on each other – but not to the point that you make the code less readable, i.e. don’t just switch hard abstractions of layers into hard abstractions of slices. I don’t want to offend anyone, I’m just putting my experience out there… why not give this a try… I promise you probably won’t die.

Vertical slices with MVC Areas
Vertical slices with MVC Areas

Take a look at the following updated controller action. You know almost exactly what it is doing just by looking at it this one method. This contains ALL of the logic that is executed by the action and to anyone first approaching this code they can be confident in their understanding of the logic without having to dig through class libraries and IoC configuration. Any changes that are made to the action would simply be made here and in the DB project, so much more maintainable! Being completely honest, even recently, seeing code written like this would rub me up the wrong way so I understand if this gets some others on edge but I’ve come full circle now and am pretty convinced of the simplified approach. And its this dichotomy I’d like to discuss.

public class StudentsController : Controller
    public ActionResult UpdateStudentDetails(StudentDetailsViewModel model)
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
            using (var context = new StudentsContext())
                var student = context.Students.Single(s => s.Id == model.StudentId);

                student.Forename = model.Forename;
                student.Surname = model.Surname;
                student.Urn = model.Urn;



        return View(model);

    private void SendStudentDetailsConfirmationEmail(Student student)

Transparent, maintainable, intention-revealing code and no need for IoC!

This is just an opening

So this has been my first attempt to open up some conversation around the use of abstractions in software. I’ve tried to keep it brief and in doing so I’ve only just scratched the surface of what I have learned and what I have to share. There is still so much more for me to cover regarding what I and others I know in the community have been experiencing in recent years: Should we abstract anything at all? What is maintainable if not SoC via IoC? How do we handle external systems integration? What about handling different clients sharing logic and data (UI, API, etc.)? How does this impact self/unit-testing code? When should we go the whole hog and abstract into physical tiers? I could go on… So I intend to write further on this subject in the coming weeks and in the meantime it would be great to hear if anyone has any thoughts on this, good or bad! So drop me a line and keep checking back for further posts.

Things I wish I knew 10 years ago: Abstractions

A C#/.NET SCEP Client

Source Code: Download Zip Archive

As you have ended up here I must assume that, like me, you have a requirement to interface with a SCEP server using .NET and you have struggled to find any helpful examples of how to achieve this. I hope that this blog entry might be of some help to the few that venture into this obscure territory.


As a little bit of background (there is too much to cover here), when I began my investigations into this area it seemed that there was pretty much only one option for implementing a .NET SCEP client and that was to use the Bouncycastle library, as the CLR System.Security.Cryptography API has some glaring omissions such as representation of a PKCS#10 request or ASN.1 DER type conversion. However this didn’t turn out to be quite the option that I had hoped. Firstly, I struggled to find any examples of a SCEP client implemented using Bouncycastle. Perhaps more importantly using 3rd party libraries always come with a risk, unless you know the code inside-and-out you have to place some trust in the authors to do the right thing. When it comes to integrating with a PKI – a major part of the infrastructure that you use to secure your digital estate – that risk seemed too great and so we had two options: either audit the Bouncycastle code-base or roll our own using the stock CLR APIs. Upon initial investigation of Bouncycastle I discovered quite quickly that it is a huge code-base and so I quickly turned to investigating building our own client, after all Bouncycastle did it so I knew it was possible, how hard could it be?

As it turns out it isn’t that hard, at least once you know the problem space, which turns out to be quite a mountain to climb for the uninitiated such as myself. My hope is that, having investigated the problem space and tackled some of the major hurdles, I am in a position to help some other people out in this area and provide a shortcut worth several days’ of effort that I could have done without.

The Example

To be clear, this isn’t going to be a full introduction into the ASN.1 and PKCS standards, there is plenty of that already very easily accessible on the Internet. Rather this is a simple working example of using the System.Security.Cryptography APIs to interface with a SCEP server. The code is documented with inline and XML comments that should point you to the online reference docs needed to understand the what and the why.

The Certificate Requests

The example I’ve provided here is in the form of a VS 2013 Unit Test project (converted from VS 2010 so beware of the old school Unit Test config!). This PoC was created for the specific case of receiving PKCS#10 signing requests and forwarding them to a PKI for enrolment via SCEP. This means that we were not concerned with creating the requests programmatically. If that is what you are after then I would suggest looking at using CertEnrol or automating the OpenSSL API. There are plenty of examples of using CertEnrol via the CERTCLIENTLib and CERTENROLLib DLLs, which are available on all Windows PC OS versions since, I think, XP. A good one is here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/alejacma/archive/2008/09/05/how-to-create-a-certificate-request-with-certenroll-and-net-c.aspx?PageIndex=3. I struggled to find a simple way of forming a PKCS#10 request with the challenge password required by most SCEP environments. At any rate, I’m wandering outside the scope of this post and I ended up creating PKCS#10 requests for my tests using Open SSL at the command line.

The SCEP Server

When developing this PoC I was working with the NDES MSCEP component that comes with Active Directory Certificate Services. There are numerous other SCEP servers available, such as OpenSSL and theoretically this PoC should work with all of them. I just felt it was worth pointing this out so that you can bear it in mind while working with the example .

Lets Get Going Already!

You will need to tweak some of the example’s settings to fit within your environment but the logic itself is sound. Start by configuring URL of the SCEP server and the subject name that is used to locate the local/client certificate for signing the SCEP enrolment request. These can both be found at the top of the Unit Test class.

The example project contains a folder named ‘SCEP Tools’ that contains the Open SSL config and batch commands to create the PKCS#10 requests needed for the tests. Once created, update the respective request string variables in each test method with the request contents and you should be good to go!

Source Code: Download Zip Archive

A C#/.NET SCEP Client